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PROPERTY TAX PRO-RATIONS

Our standard contract calls for property taxes to be pro-rated between Buyer and Seller as of the date of close of escrow. That part everyone understands, but HOW that is accomplished can be pretty confusing. The County Tax Collector only accepts full payments for each installment, so the title company has to do some adjusting on the closing figures to make it work out. Sometimes it’s a credit to the Buyer and a charge to the Seller, or vice versa. Sometimes there is a credit AND a charge, but it washes out correctly.

 

If we are closing escrow before the tax bill is due and before it has been paid, the title company will charge the Seller for the taxes they owe through the day of close of escrow, and that becomes a credit to the Buyer. They do it that way because the Buyer is going to be paying the full installment when it comes due, and that will include some time that the Seller owned the property.

 

If the Seller had already paid the installment and that covers a period of time when they will no longer own the home, then they will get a credit from the Buyer to reimburse them.

 

It gets confusing when it’s around the time that the tax bill is due. In that case, the title company will charge the Seller for the full installment (all 6 months) but then give them a credit from the Buyer for the time after close of escrow, since that time period is the Buyer’s responsibility.

 

If the Seller has an impound account with their lender, their lender will then refund them the funds that the lender had been collecting in anticipation of paying that installment. This usually comes in about 30 days after closing.

CONTINGENT OFFER SOLUTION

Last week I wrote about the challenges associated with writing an offer contingent on selling your home when your home isn’t even on the market yet. I often hear people say that they don’t want to put their home on the market until they find the home they want to buy. Their concern is that they will find a buyer for their home and then have to move out if they can’t find and purchase the home of their choice in time. But then when the “right” home does come on the market, they often lose out to other non-contingent buyers.

 

There is a potential solution available. You put your home on the market, and then when you receive an offer, you counter them with a form called “SPRP.” This stands for “Seller’s Purchase of Replacement Property.” This gives you the option to cancel the transaction if you aren’t able to locate and close escrow on the home of your choice. This alleviates the biggest concern about being homeless.

 

From the buyer’s perspective, they may not accept this contingency if they have a hard deadline to meet for their move and need more certainty that they ARE going to get this particular home by a certain date, so they just look for another house.

 

Normally, your buyer will hold off on inspections until you find the home of your choice. But there is an option in the SPRP form where you keep a contingency that you actually close escrow on the replacement property. So another concern the buyer may have is that they may have spent money on inspections, appraisal, etc. on a home that they now can’t buy. One solution is that you agree to reimburse them up to a certain amount if you do cancel the transaction at the last second.

CONTINGENT OFFERS?

I know of many people that would like to move, but don’t really HAVE to. They don’t want to put their current home on the market until they find the “right one” to buy, but because there isn’t much for sale, they continue to wait. And even when the “right one” comes on the market they find that many sellers won’t accept an offer contingent on their home selling if it’s not on the market yet.

 

One solution is to buy first, then sell after. The hard part to this option is that the lender will want to see that you can afford to make the payments on both homes, even though you plan to sell the second home soon after. The other problem with this plan is that you could own two homes for a while, and that can get expensive if it takes a while to sell your old home. You could rent out the home you are leaving to have the rent cover that payment. However, most lenders won’t just take your word on that plan. They may require a signed rental agreement, plus proof the tenant has given you a deposit and first month’s rent, and some even want proof that the tenant has taken possession. This means you would have to move out and into temporary housing yourself.

 

Another option is to put your home on the market and then ask your buyer for a long close of escrow. Some sellers will accept a contingent offer if the buyer’s home is in contract and closing looks likely. Another option is a long rent-back period after closing and you hope that the right home comes on the market before you have to move out. If not, you then move out and rent until the right home comes on the market.

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