Facebook
YouTube
LinkedIn
You are here: Home » 2017 » August

REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS

We are seeing auctions again in real estate, but they are mostly online, so it’s more like eBay.

 

Usually the opening bid is quite low compared to the market value. This is what usually attracts buyers to auctions as they think they may be able to get a “deal.” What most people don’t know is that there is often an undisclosed reserve price. So let’s say a home worth $500,000 has an opening bid of $300,000, and the highest bid is $400,000 when the auction ends. But it’s possible the owner of the property had put a reserve price of $475,000, which means the auction is just cancelled in this case. Auctions with NO reserve are preferred by buyers, but feared by sellers.

 

You can usually view the properties before bidding and it’s common to have normal loan and inspection contingencies. This means you normally don’t HAVE to pay 100% cash. You generally can be represented by an agent if you choose. Either you or your agent can register and bid for you. You will usually need to register and give your credit card information. This is so if you are the winning bidder, they can collect the deposit. This is also an attempt to make sure you are a real bidder. Although, we have heard several reports where the home’s owner logged in and created a fake account to try to bid the price up.

 

There will be a deadline for offers, but if an offer comes in within the last few minutes, they will usually automatically extend the deadline another 5-10 minutes.

 

Another oddity of auctions is something called a “Buyer’s Premium.” This is a fee that is paid by the buyer at close of escrow. I’ve seen them as low as 1% and as high as 10%. So it’s important to read EVERYTHING prior to bidding!

PRIVATE TRANSFER FEES

If you are buying a home, you need to be on the watch for something called a “Private Transfer Fee.” This is a fee that can come due whenever a property is sold, and it could be a cost to the buyer or the seller. (I am NOT talking about the County Transfer Tax.) It  can be a percentage or a flat amount but there is no minimum or maximum. The last few we have seen have been $300 to 1,000.

 

The most common purpose is that the original builder needed to offset some kind of environmental impact or affordable housing requirement required by the City or County, but they can actually be for almost anything. These have been around for a long time but were not very common. That’s changed as more builders are using this as a way to offload some costs to the new home buyer. We’ve come across several of these recently and mostly on homes built within the last 4-5 years. It’s coming to our attention now that some of those homes are being sold for the first time.

 

What’s concerning is that the sellers weren’t aware of this. I’m sure it was disclosed to them when they bought the home, but they just didn’t notice it because it was just a few lines buried in all the paperwork. We had a buyer in contract on a new home in a neighborhood where we just had this situation come up on a recent listing. We asked and the new home representative wasn’t even aware of it until we all really dug into it.

 

Bottom line is that you need to read EVERY line of the preliminary title report, and if you see anything that mentions a “transfer fee” of any kind, find out how much it is and who pays it.

WATCH WHAT YOU SIGN

I realize there is a LOT of paperwork in buying or selling a home and that we are often under a time crunch to get an offer submitted BUT you should still read what you are signing!

 

Here is a horrible recent example that will give you some extra incentive to read what you are signing. Some past clients of mine moved out of the area and started working with a local agent there and wrote several offers unsuccessfully. Very quickly they realized this agent wasn’t very experienced and very likely had a full-time job other than real estate. They politely told this agent they would be working with another agent and they got into contract on another home. However, their prior agent advised the new agent that the client had signed an exclusive buyer’s representation agreement with her, and they would owe her the full commission on the sale! The client says the agent never discussed this arrangement with her, but when they went back and reviewed all the paperwork they had signed with her, on the last transaction the buyer’s representation forms were quietly slipped in behind the offer documents and they did sign them. They may have to hire an attorney to fight this. These are highly intelligent people that this happened to. It’s just that after writing several offers, it’s easy to think these are the same documents as before, just on a different property and sign away. (Unfortunately, this is not the first time I’ve heard of this happening to someone.)

 

Another moral of the story is to only work with an ethical agent, but better still is to read everything before you sign it. If it’s a form you’ve seen before, maybe you can glance over it just to look for any changes. But watch for any new forms and ask questions of your agent!

Return to top of page

Contact Us

  • Sharp Realty
  • 320 Fairview Ave.
  • Brentwood CA 94513
  • P: 925.240.6683
  • F: 925.524.2302
  • E: info@SharpHomesOnline.com
  • DRE# 01858431